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What Does it Cost to Change the World? from WikiLeaks on Vimeo.

Via Postal Mail - You can post a donation via good old fashion postal mail to: WikiLeaks (or any suitable name likely to avoid interception in your country), BOX 4080, Australia Post Office - University of Melbourne Branch, Victoria 3052, Australia

Monday, January 01, 2007

 

Free Press requires Network Neutrality

Over the last year the big phone companies, known today as the Telecomm Industry, have been trying to conglomerate back into its past glory, the U. S. Monopoly once known as AT&T. As part of their quest to control the means of communication these networks have a plan to increase the cost of communication. There idea is to start charging for internet access by bandwidth rather than equally to each customer. Then they could offer big discounts to companies who can afford to buy most of the bandwidth. Of course, as there is a finite supply of information flow, buying up bandwidth will reduce the supply for others, and thus increase the value or decrease the speed.

What this means, over time individual users, small businesses, schools (all the people who create the value of the net) will end up paying more for less. Big companies will own the resource of communication, just as they now own energy, food, and other resources, and that could be very dangerious for democracy.

Join FreePress.net and stay aware of what is going on.
Good Luck.

Last Wednesday, we scored a significant victory in the fight to protect Net Neutrality. After intense public pressure, AT&T executives agreed to adhere to Network Neutrality conditions in order to secure FCC approval for their mega-merger with BellSouth.

While the merger itself raises serious concerns, this agreement sets a crucial precedent for Internet freedom. It's now up to the new Congress to finish the work of the FCC and make Net Neutrality permanent under the law.

Tell Congress to Make Net Neutrality the Law.

The agreement sets the bar for all future Internet policy, and paves the way for Congress to make Net Neutrality the law in 2007. That's why it's vital for you to speak up now.

Before Congress begins its new session on January 4, your elected officials need to hear from you. Sign this letter to let them know that it's time they stand with the more than a million people who spoke out forcefully in support of Internet freedom in

2006 and want permanent Net Neutrality.

Act Now: Tell Congress to Make Net Neutrality the Law
As the New Year begins, we need to stand ready and take our fight for a faster, more open and accessible Internet back to Congress. With your help, we can create a better Internet for everyone.
Best Wishes,

Timothy Karr

Campaign Director

Free Press

www.freepress.net

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