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What Does it Cost to Change the World? from WikiLeaks on Vimeo.

Via Postal Mail - You can post a donation via good old fashion postal mail to: WikiLeaks (or any suitable name likely to avoid interception in your country), BOX 4080, Australia Post Office - University of Melbourne Branch, Victoria 3052, Australia

Tuesday, February 26, 2008

 

Bees and Bats die off, prepare to pay for your food.

There are always changes in the environment: every winter all the bugs go away. But the last couple of years have seen the honey bees in North America fly away, and now the bats are going to die off, too. Lucky, the republican propaganda about climate change has kept us all questioning that "Global Warming" thing. No evidence of environmental crisis here.

"The BAT disease, dubbed "white nose syndrome" because of a flaky white fungus on the nose of many of the sick and dead bats. Scientists do not yet know if the fungus is a cause of the illness or an effect. Some of the sick bats behaved oddly, clustering near the entrance of New York caves, flying in winter when they should have been sleeping and crashing into snow banks."

Just in case though, you may want to stock up on canned fruit for a few years.

And don't blame the TOBACCO producers or Chemical Companies, neonicotinoids are just good business. Ask SYNGENTA.

Excerpt from 60 MINUTES (i.e. 40 min.).

"I think, basically, I think the insecticides are breakin' down the immune system," Hackenberg theorizes.

He says most beekeepers believe the culprit is a relatively new type of pesticide called "neonicotinoids," a synthetic chemical based on nicotine. They are now used almost everywhere, from cornfields to golf courses, and on anything from the front lawn to the family pet. They are thought to be much safer for humans and animals than other pesticides, yet still toxic enough to kill insects.

"Well, basically, the chemical, the manufacturers of this product say it breaks down their immune system, causes memory loss, causes nervous system disorders. It causes the insects to quit feeding," Hackenberg says.

Asked if he thinks that this is what has happened to the bees, Hackenberg tells Kroft, "That's exactly what we're seeing happen inside these honeybee colonies."

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